The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows for the condemnation of private property “for public use”. State Constitutions and law similarly limit eminent domain power to only be authorized for a valid public use. If FERC insists on approving pipelines without an adequate public purpose, the law could allow that without eminent domain power. The pipeline companies could then buy property rights from willing sellers. Such is the thrust of the law in the authorizations of hazardous liquid pipelines, as contrasted with natural gas pipelines.
FERC sued over alleged ‘unconstitutional’ granting of pipeline certificates
Via NJ Spotlight

In another challenge to the expansion of natural-gas pipelines, a conservation group is accusing a federal agency of unlawfully allowing the taking of private land in a complaint filed in the U.S. District Court in Trenton.

The lawsuit filed against the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by the New Jersey Conservation Foundation is the latest legal entanglement involving the 120-mile PennEast pipeline, a project spanning two […]