Electric Transmission

Transource and Public Need

Pennsylvania law allows public utility corporations to use eminent domain power when the proposed use is “for the public”. If the proposed use is for the corporation and the public, Pennsylvania law looks to who is the primary and paramount beneficiary. If it is the corporation, Pennsylvania law precludes eminent domain power.
Transource sues landowners for access to properties where power lines are proposed
Transource Energy has sued 24 landowners, asking a Franklin County, Pa., judge to allow the public utility’s representatives to access properties to perform studies, tests and surveys as it proceeds with plans for 29 miles of overhead electric-transmission lines.

The company, through a subsidiary, requested in court documents immediate right of entry onto defendants’ properties. It claims landowners are prohibiting access despite “numerous contacts” since October.

“As a Pennsylvania public utility, Transource Pennsylvania has the power of eminent domain pursuant to the Pennsylvania Business Corporation Law of 1988,” lawyers said in filings.

Transource Pennsylvania made its filings a week ago at […]

By |March 15th, 2018|Categories: Condemnation, Electric Transmission, Eminent domain, Property Rights|

Transcource – Independence Energy Connection

The proposed route of the Transcource proposed electrical transmission has been determined. Transcource is now expected to attempt to purchase easements. Landowners should be aware that eminent domain damages are based on harm to the entire property, not just the land contained within the easement(s). Some transmission line companies intentionally minimize damages by appraising incorrect property rights.
Transource settles on proposed power line route through York County
An operator of competitive wholesale electricity and its contractor have notified York County property owners of the final route of a proposed two-state transmission line it intends to submit to utility regulators in Pennsylvania and Maryland.

PJM Interconnection hired Transource Energy last year to build the $320 million “market efficiency” project, known as the “Independence Energy Connection.”

The east segment of the project includes approximately 16 miles of new overhead electric transmission line that will connect a new substation in Lower Chanceford Township to the existing Conastone Substation, near Norrisville in Harford County, Maryland.

There also is a […]

By |October 19th, 2017|Categories: Condemnation, Electric Transmission, Eminent domain|

Transcourse Energy

The Transcourse Energy plan for a high voltage power line in York County is reported to progress to a final route proposal to the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission by November 15, 2017. Owners should consult an experienced eminent domain attorney to protect owner rights on issues such as:

Eminent domain power
Regulatory approvals
Survey requests
Precondemnation activities
Harm to views
Electromagnetic fields
Easement terms
Proof of harms
Methods to value property
Just compensation
Condemnor payment of fees of owners

Experts: Landowners in path of power line project should know rights
Southern York County landowners who attended an informational meeting Thursday, Aug. 24, said they are prepared for a door knock if or when Transource Energy officials decide to step onto their property.
Hundreds of Hopewell, East Hopewell, Fawn and Lower Chanceford township residents stand to lose a portion of their land to a new above-ground high-voltage power-line project. Three state experts explained to them the rights they have to fight it.
Transource has the power of […]

By |September 13th, 2017|Categories: Condemnation, Electric Transmission, Eminent domain, Property Rights|

PPL Williams Grove-Carlisle Transmission Line Project

In January 2016 Mike Faherty spoke to a group of Cumberland County property owners threatened by eminent domain for a proposed new 69-kilovolt transmission line. Mike reviewed potential alternative routes including an existing nearby right of way corridor. Mike pointed out that the announced PPL method for calculating damages fails to comply with the required method per the Pennsylvania Eminent Domain Code. The group will challenge public need for the project.

(Photo: Pennlive.com)

By |January 18th, 2016|Categories: Condemnation, Electric Transmission, Eminent domain, Property Rights|